Tag: minneapolis (10)

Debunking Preservation Myths

Historic properties enrich our cities and capture our history. Don’t let myths about extra costs and over-regulation outweigh the benefits of undertaking your historic project! Historic buildings can’t be sustainable. FALSE. Several well-known historic buildings have been renovated to meet LEED standards. The U.S. Green Building Council recognizes historic buildings “represent significant embodied energy and cultural value”. LEED offers credits for the preservation or adaptive reuse of historic materials and features. New technologies and products make it possible to integrate sustainable solutions that improve the performance of a historic property. The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation include special Guidelines on Sustainability. Work with a historic architect to determine if any of the following modifications could improve building performance without permanently damaging historic materials: Windows | Restore windows by replacing putty or weather-stripping to create an air-tight window opening. Interior Storm Window | Installing interior storm windows can nearly double the window’s insulating value. A compression fit assembly can be installed without any additional hardware or holes in the historic frame. Insulation | Historic buildings may not have any insulation. Blown-In insulation products can be installed into walls through small holes or attic access to improve energy performance. HVAC | After testing the existing system for efficiency, a new HVAC system can be installed as necessary within the replacement cycle. High velocity air ducts have a slim profile and can be retrofit into existing walls to avoid visible ductwork or additional soffits. Restoration | Inherently sustainable features, like skylights and operable windows, naturally improve occupant comfort since they predate electricity. A designated historic building can’t be altered for ADA accessibility. FALSE. With the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, access to properties open to the public is a civil right. This doesn’t mean every property is required to install an […]

Drones in Architecture

ELK RIVER WATER TOWER Problem: How do you field measure a water tower in the middle of a Minnesota winter? A.     Risk your life to climb an icy freezing slippery ladder and use a tape measure and laser pointer to get an approximation of size. B.    Fly a drone and take pictures and use these images to create a point cloud and Revit family with exact dimensions. Answer:   B: Fly a drone.   Working with the City of Elk River and CAD Technology Center (CTC), an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV aka Drone) was flown the morning of February 8, 2018.  The drone set-up and flight only took a few hours and the flight created a photo scan of the water tower by taking hundreds of digital photos.  CTC processes the data and created a point cloud file in Revit.  From this file, a Revit family component was created that is a full sized three-dimensional digital representation of the water tower After Kodet received the Revit model, some detail had to be added to the model, but the basic dimensions, size, shape, and heights were a part of the model created from the photo scan. Kodet used this model to create drawings for contractors to estimate renovation costs to repaint the historical water tower. Countless hours were saved in field time and modeling time. In the end, a much more accurate set of drawings were created because of the use of the drone. The documentation process to get contractors to be able to bid the project became very simple and cost effective. The client was also pleased with the results and accuracy of the drawings that were created by the UAV Scan. Our office looks forward to using this highly advanced technology, which is constantly changing on future projects. Flying […]

Designing Safe + Secure Schools

PART 1 | School Security Practices Whether or not your building a new school, retrofitting, or renovating, it is always the right time to review your school’s security infrastructure to ensure your students, staff, and school personnel are as safe as possible. As important as cameras, scanners, lighting, and alarms are within a school’s security system, the must be supported by training, policies, and most importantly collaboration with the other systems creating a holistic approach to your school’s security design. In this 3-part series we will look at the process for developing a school security assessment to develop specific actions and discuss response and recovery options. PART 1 | We will dive into a process of ASSESSING your current facility with an honest look at the security and threats. PART 2 | We will develop specific action steps to the school district’s PREPAREDNESS. PART 3 | We will discuss RESPONSE + RECOVERY. FACILITY SECURITY ASSESSMENT A complete and holistic facility assessment is a combined team effort that involves steps to develop a comprehensive program that is used to review how our current facilities are built, how they function, and how current school policies affect security within school buildings. SECURITY ASSESSMENT TEAM The Security Assessment Team should be made up of a diverse team of: Students + Teachers + Administrators Parents + Community + Local Law Enforcement Architect + Security Professionals Superintendent The assessment team should provide a comprehensive district-wide analysis of current facility infrastructure, design, maintenance, policies, and procedures. The assessment team will compile all findings and research into a document that can be reviewed and updated on a regular basis. At minimum the Team will review the following items for your School Security Assessment: Building Exterior Conditions and relationship to such factors and environmental design + site configuration for vehicle and […]

Envisioning the Firm of the Future

Kyle Palzer is the AIA North Central States Region Associate Director (RAD) for 2018 & 2019.  As such he serves on the AIA National Associates Committee (NAC) which is comprised of 29 non-licensed AIA members from across the country.  The NAC and the YAF (Young Architects Forum – 29 recently licensed AIA members) come together once a year for a Joint Annual Meeting, which took place in Phoenix, AZ February 8-10th 2018. It was a pleasure to join fellow Emerging Professionals from across the country to envision what the future of the architecture profession might look like.  However, the meeting went beyond just planning, by beginning to develop concepts and ways in which to implement and effect change. The National Associates Committee is focused on making new headways in four areas over the next year; Future Practice, Advocacy, Mentorship, and Research.  For the upcoming year I will be a part of the Future Practice Workgroup, which seeks to develop a Firm Culture Document similar to the Studio Culture Document created by the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) in December 2000. In order to implement such a document, my workgroup will first draft an Emerging Professional Position Statement, which seeks to envision what the future associate member will want and need to be successful in the profession 15 years down the road.  As firm environments continue to change, and the ways in which we interact, and work evolve, there is a need to adapt to these changes.  This is beneficial not just for firms to retain talent, but to remain competitive with other fields.  If architecture fails to adapt to these changing working styles, many may see a profession that remains rooted in the past, when in fact quite the opposite needs to happen, as it is the role of […]

CANstruction 2017

CANstruction 2017 The story of our 2017 Canstruction sculpture takes inspiration from a captivating children’s book “My Father’s Dragon.” After receiving the 2016 Canstruction International Citywide Competition Award for “Beat Meal,” Kodet again teamed up with the Minneapolis City of Lakes Rotary Club and numerous other generous sponsors to participate in the 12th Annual Canstruction Minneapolis exhibition. Canstruction is an event where architecture, engineering, and construction firms participate in a competition creating structures entirely out of cans. Canstruction was created to help raise awareness of hunger, and over 150 cities across the globe host Canstruction events to benefit local hunger relief. The Minneapolis exhibition benefits Second Harvest Heartland. This was the third year that we participated, and the sculpture is described below by Kodet team members: This sculpture depicts a young boy reading his own story. Looking over his shoulder is the blue and yellow dragon he freed from captivity. “My Father’s Dragon” is an enchanting children’s book about a young boy collaborating with his animal friends to create a better world. Our Canstruction story is very similar. Kodet Architectural Group collaborated with the Minneapolis City of Lakes Rotary Club and many other sponsors to donate this sculpture. Together with Second Harvest Heartland, we are “dragging-away” hunger. “My Father’s Dragon” carries a special significance to our prime supporters at the Minneapolis City of Lakes Rotary Club. Each week, the Rotary Club’s guest speaker will sign a book to be donated to Way to Grow, a Minneapolis non-profit dedicated to early childhood education.  For our structure, you will find our characters sitting on clouds made of cream corn.  The boy and the dragon are made of different tunas, chicken, and albacore as these types of items are greatly needed at food shelves. We felt the theme “Dragon Away Hunger” fit well as […]

Kodet Architectural Group AIA-Minnesota Firm Award

2017 Firm Award

AIA-Minnesota Firm Award AIA Minnesota has announced and recognized Kodet Architectural Group as the 2017 AIA Minnesota Firm Award recipient. Given biennially, this prestigious award is the highest honored bestowed by the association, recognizing an AIA Minnesota member firm that has made outstanding contributions to the advancement of the profession of architecture. “Design excellence is a hallmark of any Kodet project, but what made them outstanding to the jury is far more than their exceptional body of award-winning work.”  – Meredith Hayes Gordon, AIA, AIA Minnesota President + Selection Committee Member The AIA Minnesota firm award selection committee, comprised of AIA Minnesota board members and leadership, agreed that Kodet met or exceeded all criteria for selection, which included: Demonstrating Depth + Breadth of Work Impacting the Profession in Minnesota Produced Work that is a Product of a Collaborative Environment Work that Transcends Specific Areas of Expertise Work that is Known by the Profession + Outside for its Quality Our firm is truly honored to receive the award and from all of us here at Kodet we appreciate the kind words provided from our fellow architects, colleagues, and clients.  We pride ourselves on our commitment to community service, volunteer efforts, and in working with our clients within the community which build upon efficiencies, aesthetics, longevity while establishing long-standing relationships. Kodet will be honored at the AIA Minnesota Awards Celebration on December 8, 2017, at International Market Square, Minneapolis. To learn more about the Firm Award, please click here.