Tag: kodet architectural group (10)

Selecting the Perfect Furniture

Not all clients consider the benefits of having the architect also serve as the primary interior designer for a project. There are a numerous benefits, that range from comprehensive design aesthetics to understanding how all the details come together – to create well-rounded and thoughtfully designed project. CHARACTER + AESTHETIC Having the architect serve as the lead furniture designer/selector has many benefits for a client. First, the architect generally sets the overall design idea for a project, so they know exactly what pieces of furniture match the design aesthetics they were intending for a space.  Likewise, they can better choose pieces that fit a space well. For example, a round space could benefit from round furniture pieces to accentuate the characteristics of a room STYLE + CONSISTENCY The same quality holds true for picking out furniture fabrics in a project. If the architect is the lead designer in the this area, they can choose patterns + colors that again match the overall feel + style of your project.  This allows the furniture to work well with other pieces, has colors, and patterns that feel cohesive and additionally fit well within a space.   FINANCIAL BENEFITS Beyond the aesthetic benefits a project gains financially from having the architect as the lead interior designer.  The architect is uniquely positioned to be a natural non-biased party in the selection of furniture as they do not represent specific manufacturers or have financial stake in pushing new products or those that may have a higher margin of profit for a vendor.  The architect, can compare multiple vendors that offer similar products to help clients pick furniture that both matches their budget and project style. Architects can therefore help owners put together competitive solicitations for quotations, where they can then issue to multiple furniture vendors for […]

Women In Architecture

WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ORGANIZATION | EXHIBITION OPENING The Women in Architecture Student Organization (WIASO) was formed in the fall of 2017 by a group of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Minnesota. WIASO’s primary goals are to work to counteract unconscious cultural bias that permeates through academia and the profession, and to engage issues within the field of architecture related to diversity and the advancement of gender equity. The group recently completed an exhibition in partnership with the Goldstein Museum of Design titled Gendering Architecture, Architecting Gender, that showcases historic and contemporary female architects. The exhibition is located in the HGA Gallery of Rapson Hall at the University of Minnesota and will be on display until February 3, 2019. Below is an excerpt from an interview with WIASO published on the UMN’s College of Design website: What inspired WIASO to create this exhibition? We are interested in learning about female figures in the architectural profession and publicizing work of women in the field. During our initial kick-off event, we profiled several female architects, displayed statistics describing the lack of equity in the field, and shared architecture books written by women. We received feedback about the group’s goals and aspirations and Assistant Professor Daniela Sandler (Architecture) suggested we expand this idea into an exhibition showcasing this information in Rapson. Why do you think it is important for people to see this exhibition? We want students, faculty, and professionals to acknowledge the contributions of female architects who have been dismissed, belittled, or denied credit for their work. By looking at architectural movements from a critical feminist perspective, one is able to reimagine history around marginalized identities and redefine what it means to be an architect. The exhibition is a glimpse of a shared history among female architects at the […]

Virtual Reality in Architecture

VIRTUAL REALITY IN ARCHITECTURE Even if you are not a computer techy person, you have probably seen those strange headset things people put on to be in a virtual environment.  Usually these are part of a gaming system that can create a very realistic digital environment called Virtual Reality (VR).  The gaming industry is pushing computer manufacturers to improve computer processing speeds that make it affordable for the general public, including smaller architecture firms, to purchase computers that can handle the VR demands. EVOLUTION Virtual reality is not new for architects though.  Drawings and models have been tools architects have used to develop their designs for centuries.  Perspectives, isometrics, and three-dimensional (3D) models are the traditional techniques architects have used to visualize a space and relay that vision to a client or community.  As technology has evolved, these visual representations have gone from hand drawings and physical models to three-dimensional computer-generated images and 3D printed models to fully digital immersive experiences (Virtual Reality) where one can almost feel like they are walking through a space. The evolution of 3D representation allows designers more tools to help clients understand the design of a future space.  Each space and client are different and should be evaluated on the best use of technology to satisfy the owner’s needs.  Architects strive to design spaces that are functional for their clients, and the more the client understands the space and can understand the design intent the higher probability the space will perform as the client envisions. VISUALIZATION A fully interactive virtual reality experience through a headset can be an unsettling or uncomfortable experience for some and designers must know the best approach for each client or community.  Depending on the building type and location, many people can see a 3D image and understand how it […]

Kodet Architectural Group Historic Restoration Rendering

Balancing Contemporary Needs and Historic Preservation

Finding a balance between contemporary needs and the requirements of historic preservation can be a challenge.  There are established paths to success for those that work to maintain historic buildings in active use.  The following are a few upfront planning considerations when considering an historic rehabilitation. Proposed Uses Identifying a suitable use is essential.  This is relatively fairly straightforward if the use matches the original use. However, that is always not an option and suitable contemporary uses need to be explored.  A well selected new use will not compromise ‘historic character defining features’.    For example a use that would require modifications to an existing historic storefront would not be suitable.  On the other hand, a use might be viable if changes would be limited to modifications or additions to a non-historic interior or non-primary façade. Building Codes In-depth code analysis is essential to confirm whether the proposed use can be safely incorporated into the building.  The scope of work required to accommodate the proposed use within the code will vary greatly with the nature of the historic structure and the proposed use.  Consequently, it is important that this analysis occur early.  Code compliance is rarely a one-size-fits-all proposition with historic structures.  Building codes in recent years have evolved to offer various pathways to compliance.  This greatly assists working with historic structures that don’t fit neatly within contemporary building conventions. Contemporary Systems & Technology Whether the proposed use matches the historic use or is entirely contemporary, it is almost always necessary to incorporate new systems and to do so with as little impact or loss of historic character as possible.  Successfully incorporating new systems requires understanding the opportunities and limitations of how a building is constructed as well as a willingness to look for creative solutions. Evolving technologies offers increasingly less […]

Debunking Preservation Myths

Historic properties enrich our cities and capture our history. Don’t let myths about extra costs and over-regulation outweigh the benefits of undertaking your historic project! Historic buildings can’t be sustainable. FALSE. Several well-known historic buildings have been renovated to meet LEED standards. The U.S. Green Building Council recognizes historic buildings “represent significant embodied energy and cultural value”. LEED offers credits for the preservation or adaptive reuse of historic materials and features. New technologies and products make it possible to integrate sustainable solutions that improve the performance of a historic property. The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation include special Guidelines on Sustainability. Work with a historic architect to determine if any of the following modifications could improve building performance without permanently damaging historic materials: Windows | Restore windows by replacing putty or weather-stripping to create an air-tight window opening. Interior Storm Window | Installing interior storm windows can nearly double the window’s insulating value. A compression fit assembly can be installed without any additional hardware or holes in the historic frame. Insulation | Historic buildings may not have any insulation. Blown-In insulation products can be installed into walls through small holes or attic access to improve energy performance. HVAC | After testing the existing system for efficiency, a new HVAC system can be installed as necessary within the replacement cycle. High velocity air ducts have a slim profile and can be retrofit into existing walls to avoid visible ductwork or additional soffits. Restoration | Inherently sustainable features, like skylights and operable windows, naturally improve occupant comfort since they predate electricity. A designated historic building can’t be altered for ADA accessibility. FALSE. With the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, access to properties open to the public is a civil right. This doesn’t mean every property is required to install an […]

Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd | Preserving Character

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD | PRESERVING CHARACTER The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd in Minneapolis had begun to turn the page into a new chapter, which called for an adaptation to their sacred space to meet contemporary needs. Originally built over 65 years ago, the renovation aimed to uphold the historic integrity and respectfully adapting the Vic Gilbertson, FAIA mid-century modern church to meet current programmatic needs. The Kodet Team understood the importance of this historic restoration and through carefully studying sketches and the building’s artwork we were able to develop a better understanding for the back-story and connection to the details. Integral to the renovation was the idea of strengthening the bond between the church and the congregation, which reflects the celebration of their faith and community. The ever-present theme was preservation + improving functionality to serve current and future generations. ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTION The renovation and restoration looked how to make the best use of the buildings great art and architecture. A key element was to connect the existing sanctuary to the existing courtyard originally separated by brick wall with stained glass windows. By removing the south wall of the nave, we were able to expand the space by creating large custom wood sliding doors. These grand doors open the worship space to the new catwalk, which features a balcony overlooking the updated exterior courtyard. The worship expansion and inclusion of these custom doors incorporated the relocated original stained glass and allows a full view over the courtyard and introduces natural light into the sanctuary. Most importantly, we were able to creatively save and utilize the existing stained glass panels. By using materials original to the building and combining this with the glass, the changes transformed the church from an introverted interior focused space to a […]

Emerging Professionals Firm Tour

Have you ever been to an architecture firm? When I decided to become an architect, I had met exactly 2 architects and only visited one of their firms. Call it love at first sight. Call it a leap of faith. I was 14 and knew I wanted to be an architect. Over the next 8 years, I didn’t meet another architect until graduate school. A career path into architecture does not require this blind leap of faith. This year, the AIA Emerging Professional’s Committee (EPC) is coordinating Firm Tours at 6 different architecture firms in the Twin Cities. These firms open their doors for students and early career professionals to experience their work space and unique culture. You get a guided tour of the office, hear about projects, and ask questions about daily tasks and challenges. The 2018 Firm Tours are a revamp of the EPC’s Draughting Club. At Draughting Club, emerging professionals and students in the Twin Cities could meet, enjoy a local brewery or distillery, and chat about challenges we face in our early architectural career. The new Firm Tours still foster a relaxed atmosphere for networking but with several upgrades: Meeting experienced professionals from the host firm Seeing architecturally designed offices Tours guided by firm leadership Free food! In April, Kodet Architectural Group is hosting the EPC Firm Tour in collaboration with the AIA Architecture in Schools Committee. We invite emerging professionals of all ages (high schoolers, undergraduates, graduate students, and early professionals) to see our office by the Walker Art Center. It’s a free tour with snacks and beverages but space is limited. Register today at this link  We work in a remodeled mansion complete with fireplaces, beautiful woodwork, and “bridge” addition off the back. It’s a fun place to see, but the character of our […]